giddy

gid·dy (gĭd’ē)
adj. gid·di·er, gid·di·est 1) a) Having a reeling, lightheaded sensation; dizzy. b) Causing or capable of causing dizziness: »

a giddy climb to the topmast.

2) Frivolous and lighthearted; flighty: »

was giddy with excitement at the news.

intr. & tr.v. gid·died, gid·dy·ing, gid·dies To become or make giddy.
[Middle English gidi, crazy, from Old English gidig; see gheu(ə)-.]
gid’di·ly adv. gid’di·ness n.
Word History: Though little trace of a divine provenance can be discerned in its modern meaning, giddy is derived from the same ancient Germanic word (*gudam) that has given us the word God. The Germanic word *gudigaz, formed from the word *gudam, meant "possessed by a god." Such possession can be a rather unbalancing experience, and so it is not surprising that the Old English descendant of *gudigaz, gidig, meant "mad, possessed by an evil spirit," or that the Middle English development of gidig, gidi, meant the same thing, as well as "foolish," "mad (used of an animal)," "dizzy," and "uncertain, unstable." Our sense "lighthearted, frivolous" represents the ultimate secularization of giddy.

Word Histories. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Giddy — Gid dy, a. [Compar. {Giddier}; superl. {Giddiest}.] [OE. gidi mad, silly, AS. gidig, of unknown origin, cf. Norw. gidda to shake, tremble.] [1913 Webster] 1. Having in the head a sensation of whirling or reeling about; having lost the power of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • giddy — giddy, dizzy, vertiginous, swimming, dazzled are comparable when meaning affected by or producing a sensation of being whirled about or around and consequently confused. Giddy and dizzy are often used interchangeably with one another but giddy is …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • giddy — [gid′ē] adj. giddier, giddiest [ME gidie < OE gydig, insane, prob. < base (* gud) of god, GOD + ig (see Y3): hence, basic meaning “possessed by a god”] 1. feeling dizzy or unsteady 2. causing or likely to cause dizziness [a giddy height] …   English World dictionary

  • Giddy — Gid dy, v. i. To reel; to whirl. Chapman. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Giddy — Gid dy, v. t. To make dizzy or unsteady. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • giddy — index capricious, frivolous, thoughtless, volatile Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • giddy — O.E. gidig, variant of gydig insane, mad, stupid, possessed (by a spirit), probably from P.Gmc. *gud iga , from *gudam god + * ig possessed. Meaning having a confused, swimming sensation is from 1560s. Meaning elated is from 1540s …   Etymology dictionary

  • giddy — [adj] silly, impulsive bemused, brainless, bubbleheaded*, capricious, careless, changeable, changeful, ditzy*, dizzy, empty headed*, erratic, fickle, flighty*, flustered, frivolous, gaga*, heedless, inconstant, irresolute, irresponsible,… …   New thesaurus

  • giddy — ► ADJECTIVE (giddier, giddiest) 1) having or causing a sensation of whirling and a tendency to fall or stagger; dizzy. 2) excitable and frivolous. ► VERB (giddies, giddied) ▪ make (someone) feel excited to the point of disorientation …   English terms dictionary

  • giddy-up — ► EXCLAMATION ▪ said to induce a horse to start moving or go faster. ORIGIN reproducing a pronunciation of get up …   English terms dictionary

  • giddy-ap — giddy ap, up see giddap v …   Useful english dictionary

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